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SFC-funded project wins Guardian University award

SFC-funded project wins Guardian University award

27 Apr 2018

The Guardian University Awards recognise the universities that inspire students, transform communities and the innovative ways they’re updating themselves to meet the demands of an inclusive, diverse, digital world.

The University of Strathclyde won the Advancing Staff Equality award for its SFC-funded TransEDU project looking at what can be done to better support trans students and staff.

Strathclyde academics, Stephanie McKendry and Matson Lawrence, who is currently on secondment to SFC as a senior policy officer, researched the challenges faced by transgender, non-binary and gender diverse people in colleges and universities. Their research is the first in the UK to be published on this issue, and provides an important evidence base for policy makers.

The project provides guidance, toolkits and training through its website. The TransEDU team has also carried out consultation and training events with institutions across the UK and delivered presentations, seminars and workshops at 17 national conferences.

This wasn’t the only Scottish success, with Glasgow Caledonian University scooping runner up in the same category for its work to address the under-representation of female academic staff in senior roles and tackle the gender pay gap.

The University of Strathclyde also won a second award with the Retention, Support and Student Outcomes category for its work with care-experienced students, and Heriot-Watt University won Business Collaboration with its ORCA (offshore robotics for certification of assets hub) for the offshore energy industry.

The University of Stirling was runner up in the Student Experience category for its institutional strategy to prevent sexual violence and the University of Glasgow and Heriot-Watt  University were runners-up in the Research Impact category for a bone-mending technique that could help treat landmine victims (Glasgow) and super-resolution microscopy (Heriot-Watt).